Spotlight on Methods and Tools: Self-evaluation Tool for Action in Partnership

 
 

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Do you work in partnership? Don’t miss this exciting webinar presentation by Gillian Kranias of Health Nexus and Angèle Bilodeau, author of the Self-Evaluation Tool for Action in Partnership. This free webinar is hosted by the National Collaborating Centre on Methods and Tools (NCCMT).

This tool provides members of a partnership with the opportunity to express perceptions and opinions on their partnership experiences. The tool’s 18 items are related to the following six requirements for effective partnership work:

  1. the range of perspectives relevant to the issue

  2. early stakeholder involvement in strategic decisions

  3. engagement of stakeholders in negotiating and influencing decisions

  4. commitment of strategic and pivotal stakeholders to the project

  5. partnership arrangements that favour equalization of power among the stakeholders

  6. partnership arrangements that help build collective action

For more information and to register, visit the National Collaborating Centre on Methods and Tools (NCCMT).

Dr. Kellie Leitch Calls for New Children’s Fitness Tax Credit

Dr. Kellie Leitch, Member of Parliament for Simcoe—Grey today announced her Private Member’s Bill that will make more affordable for Canadian parents to keep their kids healthy and active. Her Bill, an “Act to Amend the Income Tax Act (Child Fitness Tax Credit)” proposes a new Children’s Fitness Tax Credit with added improvements for parents of children with disabilities.

“I have long been a passionate advocate for healthy and active children,” said Dr. Leitch. “Even before I entered elected politics, I was involved in the initial development of the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit, which was revolutionary in that it helped families get kids active and healthy. I believe that canceling this credit was a poor choice. With this Bill, I hope to fix this and make it easier for Canadian children to lead a healthy active lifestyle.”

Dr. Leitch’s Bill will allow:

  • Parents of a child aged 18 and under who is enrolled in an eligible physical activity will be able to deduct up to $500 from their taxes in an eligible taxation year;

  • Parents of a child aged 21 and under who has a disability and is enrolled in an eligible physical activity will be able to deduct up to $1000 from their taxes in an eligible taxation year;

  • Parents of a child aged 18 and under who has a disability and is enrolled in an eligible physical activity will be able combine both credits for a deduction of $1500 in an eligible taxation year.

43% of Canadian families with children claimed the previous Children’s Fitness Tax Credit in 2014. The government eliminated it in 2017.

For more information, visit www.healthykidshealthycanada.ca

CHILD Cohort Study: Breastmilk microbiome linked to method of feeding

New research from the CHILD Cohort Study sheds some light on the importance of the infant’s mouth as a source of breastmilk bacteria.

The idea that breastmilk has a microbiome—a community of bacteria living within it—is relatively new and has sparked debate about where breastmilk bacteria come from.

The new research, published February 13, 2019, in Cell Host & Microbe, found that among the many factors examined, the method of breastfeeding—whether mothers fed their infants directly at the breast or fed them pumped breastmilk from a bottle—was most consistently associated with the composition of the milk microbiome.

Direct breastfeeding was associated with microbes typically found in the mouth, a greater abundance of the beneficial Bifidobacteria, and higher overall bacterial richness and diversity.

“We found that milk bacteria are different in mothers who pump their milk,” says CHILD investigator Dr. Meghan Azad (University of Manitoba), who led the study. “We suspect that pumping may prevent the transfer of oral bacteria from the infant to the mother and might introduce other bacteria from the pump.”

The researchers used data from nearly 400 infants and their mothers participating in the CHILD Cohort Study.

Read AllerGen’s press release

Black History Month: Health Resources for Black Youth in Canada

By Muhanad Ali, Director of Communications, Young Canadians Roundtable on Health

Picture taken from ETFO Magazine on    Teaching Black Canadian History Every Month

Picture taken from ETFO Magazine on Teaching Black Canadian History Every Month

Black history month was first introduced to the House of Commons in 1995 by Honourable Jean Augustine, the first Black Canadian woman elected to Parliament. In 2008, Senator Donald Oliver, the first Black man to be appointed to the Senate, who put forth a motion to recognize not only this history month, but also all the tremendous achievements and contributions Black Canadians – completing parliamentary motion and its position on this issue (Government of Canada, 2019).

As such, we encourage you to learn, organize, engage, speak, and reflect on this country’s Black history and the experience of Black Canadians. There are many events happening across this country during this memorable month, which we encourage you to participate. Here are some to look forward to, including some resources regarding the history of Black Canada:  

Black History in Canada – Education Guide

Historic Black Canadian communities – Government of Canada

Key Events in Black Canadian History – Government of Canada

Health Resources for Black Youth in Canada

Health Resources for Black Youth in Canada.jpg

Help Statistics Canada validate how they measure poverty

Statistics Canada has created a short questionnaire that allows Canadians to provide input on current estimates of how much money a family needs for items like food, clothing, shelter and transportation.

The questionnaire takes no more than five minutes to complete, and will be open to all Canadians until January 31, 2019. Participation is anonymous and respondent information is protected by the Privacy Act.

For more information on this initiative and to fill out the questionnaire, please visit www.statcan.gc.ca/measuringpoverty.